Waking Life

Following my review of Robots Will Steal Your Job, But That’s OK, I’ve just finished watching a film called Waking Life, directed by Richard Linklater.

This might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but I loved this film for its originality if nothing else. For me, Waking Life is one of those art forms that reminds you that you can like something and not really know why.

There isn’t really a story to anchor to here, the protagonist is seemingly trapped in a maze of dreams, and experiences a series of conversations discussing the meaning of life, some of which are intriguing and insightful, whilst others come across like they’re purposefully nonsense.

The film is shot like a documentary but has been converted in post to appear caricatured on a cartoon landscape.

Anyway it’s one of the more interesting films I’ve watched in recent months, so check it out if you haven’t seen it already. Likewise, let me know if there are any thought provoking films you’d recommend.

 

Have you read A Game For The Young?
Share your comments #agamefortheyoung

ORDER ON PAPERBACK | EBOOK
AMAZON (UK) | AMAZON (US) | WATERSTONES | BARNES & NOBLE | KOBO | SCRIBD | ROWANVALE BOOKS

 

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

Advertisements

Book Review: Star Wars – Lords Of The Sith by Paul S. Kemp

Published: April 28, 2015

“Seventy percent the perfect Star Wars novel.”

fourstars

What Is ‘Lords Of The Sith’ About?

When the Emperor and his notorious apprentice, Darth Vader, find themselves stranded in the middle of insurgent action on an inhospitable planet, they must rely on each other, the Force, and their own ruthlessness to prevail.

In the Star Wars timeline, ‘Lords Of The Sith’ takes place between ‘Revenge of the Sith’ & ‘A New Hope’.

Why Did I Read ‘Lords Of The Sith’?

If I was honest, I read this purely as an appetiser before the release of Rogue One. A Star Wars novel wasn’t on the list but the opportunity came up and I couldn’t resist.

What I Liked About ‘Lords Of The Sith’

I think this was the first time where I could start a story and immediately be able to visualise everything clearly. The surroundings, the characters, I was instantly on board. But that’s to be expected, and is as much a test for the author as it is for the reader.

For a Star Wars novel, this is really dark in parts. Betrayal, revenge, anger, the graphic detail of beatings and characters being choked to death are all present. But it’s not as clear cut as good versus evil, the rebels are given back story and depth in a way that’s lacking for many of them in the films, and we see how they can be reckless and overly aggressive at times.

The first two thirds of this novel are fantastic. This is seventy percent the perfect Star Wars novel.

What I Didn’t Like About ‘Lords Of The Sith’

It’s difficult to conjure up any real sense of danger for Vadar or the Emperor, especially considering where the characters are in the timeline of the overall story.

The book is called ‘Lords of the Sith’, which is a great title, but this isn’t a story devoted to the dark side. You spend as much time with the rebels. ‘Lords of the Sith’ is just a title.

There’s quite a few lines of dialog with Vadar where he seems out of character. He doesn’t sound like the Vadar you know from the films.
I also found the final third of this novel really disappointing.

Good Or Bad?

Was it any good? Considering we’re now in an era where more Star Wars films are to be expected, novels of this nature suddenly have a new relevance to them within the Star Wars universe. That being said I don’t think this is a film waiting to happen. This isn’t a bad novel, I was just disappointed by the ending. At a point when the novel should have come together, it sort of fell flat for me.
Would I recommend it? I don’t know if this is one of the better Star Wars novels. I’d like to think there were better ones out there.
Would I read it again? No.

Here are some other reviews:

Looking For Alaska by John Green
The Hidden Legacy by GJ Minett
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Paper Towns by John Green
Parable Of The Sower by Octavia E. Butler
The Fault In Our Stars by John Green
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

What’s on the list?
Robots Will Steal Your Job, But That’s OK by Federico Pistono
The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks
Parable of the Talents by Octavia E. Butler
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
The Perks Of Being A Wallfower by Stephen Chbosky
Lie in Wait by GJ Minett


Have you read A Game For The Young?
Share your comments #agamefortheyoung

ORDER ON PAPERBACK | EBOOK
AMAZON (UK) | AMAZON (US) | WATERSTONES | BARNES & NOBLE | KOBO | SCRIBD | ROWANVALE BOOKS

 

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

The Impact Of Technological Advances On The Job Market

About a month ago I attended a conference in Amsterdam and was blown away by a presentation from Federico Pistono. Federico is a social entrepreneur, public speaker, founder and CEO of konoz, a global community dedicated to giving equal access to high-quality, free educational videos. The talk went pretty much like this:

I’m currently reading “Robots Will Steal Your Job, But That’s OK” which is proving to be fantastic, but I’ve also come across a brilliant quote from Dr. Robert Goldman MD (Goldman is World Chairman of the International Medical Commission, Founder & Chairman of International Sports Hall of Fame and an Antiaging & Sports Medicine Pioneer). He’s given an interesting, summarised overview on this fascinating subject:

“In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide. Within just a few years, their business model disappeared and they went bankrupt. What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 10 years – and most people don’t see it coming. Did you think in 1998 that 3 years later you would never take pictures on paper film again? Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975. The first ones only had 10,000 pixels, but followed Moore’s law. So as with all exponential technologies, it was a disappointment for a long time, before it became way superior and got mainstream in only a few short years. It will now happen with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous and electric cars, education, 3D printing, agriculture and jobs. Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age.

Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years.
Uber is just a software tool, they don’t own any cars, and are now the biggest taxi company in the world. Airbnb is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don’t own any properties.

Artificial Intelligence: Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world. This year, a computer beat the best Go player in the world, 10 years earlier than expected. In the US, young lawyers already don’t get jobs. Because of IBM Watson, you can get legal advice (so far for more or less basic stuff) within seconds, with 90% accuracy compared with 70% accuracy when done by humans. So if you study law, stop immediately. There will be 90% fewer lawyers in the future, only specialists will remain. Watson already helps nurses diagnosing cancer, 4 time more accurate than human nurses. Facebook now has a pattern recognition software that can recognize faces better than humans. By 2030, computers will become more intelligent than humans.

Autonomous Cars: In 2018 the first self-driving cars will appear for the public. Around 2020, the complete industry will start to be disrupted. You don’t want to own a car anymore. You will call a car with your phone, it will show up at your location and drive you to your destination. You will not need to park it, you only pay for the driven distance and can be productive while driving. Our kids will never get a driver’s license and will never own a car. It will change the cities, because we will need 90-95% fewer cars for that. We can transform former parking space into parks. 1.2 million people die each year in car accidents worldwide. We now have one accident every 100,000 km, with autonomous driving that will drop to one accident in 10 million km. That will save a million lives each year.

Most car companies may become bankrupt. Traditional car companies try the evolutionary approach and just build a better car, while tech companies (Tesla, Apple, Google) will do the revolutionary approach and build a computer on wheels. I spoke to a lot of engineers from Volkswagen and Audi; they are completely terrified of Tesla.

Insurance Companies will have massive trouble because without accidents, the insurance will become 100x cheaper. Their car insurance business model will disappear.

Real estate will change. Because if you can work while you commute, people will move further away to live in a more beautiful neighborhood.

Electric cars won’t become mainstream until 2020. Cities will be less noisy because all cars will run on electric. Electricity will become incredibly cheap and clean: Solar production has been on an exponential curve for 30 years, but you can only now see the impact. Last year, more solar energy was installed worldwide than fossil. The price for solar will drop so much that all coal companies will be out of business by 2025.

With cheap electricity comes cheap and abundant water. Desalination now only needs 2kWh per cubic meter. We don’t have scarce water in most places, we only have scarce drinking water. Imagine what will be possible if anyone can have as much clean water as he wants, for nearly no cost.

Health: There will be companies that will build a medical device (called the “Tricorder” from Star Trek) that works with your phone, which takes your retina scan, your blood sample and you breathe into it. It then analyses 54 biomarkers that will identify nearly any disease. It will be cheap, so in a few years everyone on this planet will have access to world class medicine, nearly for free.

3D printing: The price of the cheapest 3D printer came down from $18,000 to $400 within 10 years. In the same time, it became 100 times faster. All major shoe companies started 3D printing shoes. Spare airplane parts are already 3D printed in remote airports. The space station now has a printer that eliminates the need for the large number of spare parts they used to have in the past.

At the end of this year, new smart phones will have 3D scanning possibilities. You can then 3D scan your feet and print your perfect shoe at home. In China, they already 3D printed a complete 6-storey office building. By 2027, 10% of everything that’s being produced will be 3D printed.

Business Opportunities: If you think of a niche you want to go in, ask yourself: “in the future, do you think we will have that?” and if the answer is yes, how can you make that happen sooner? If it doesn’t work with your phone, forget the idea. And any idea designed for success in the 20th century is doomed in to failure in the 21st century.

Work: 70-80% of jobs will disappear in the next 20 years. There will be a lot of new jobs, but it is not clear if there will be enough new jobs in such a small time.

Agriculture: There will be a $100 agricultural robot in the future. Farmers in 3rd world countries can then become managers of their field instead of working all days on their fields. Agroponics will need much less water. The first Petri dish produced veal is now available and will be cheaper than cow-produced veal in 2018. Right now, 30% of all agricultural surfaces is used for cows. Imagine if we don’t need that space anymore. There are several startups that will bring insect protein to the market shortly. It contains more protein than meat. It will be labeled as “alternative protein source” (because most people still reject the idea of eating insects).

There is an app called “moodies” which can already tell in which mood you are. Until 2020 there will be apps that can tell by your facial expressions if you are lying. Imagine a political debate where it’s being displayed when they are telling the truth and when not.

Bitcoin will become mainstream this year and might even become the default reserve currency.

Longevity: Right now, the average life span increases by 3 months per year. Four years ago, the life span used to be 79 years, now it’s 80 years. The increase itself is increasing and by 2036, there will be more than one year increase per year. So we all might live for a long long time, probably way more than 100.

Education: The cheapest smart phones are already at $10 in Africa and Asia. Until 2020, 70% of all humans will own a smart phone. That means, everyone has the same access to world class education.

Robert M. Goldman MD, PhD, DO, FAASP
http://www.DrBobGoldman.com
World Chairman-International Medical Commission
Co-Founder & Chairman of the Board-A4M
Founder & Chairman-International Sports Hall of Fame
Co-Founder & Chairman-World Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine
President Emeritus-National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)
Chairman-U.S. Sports Academy’s Board of Visitors”

 

I’ll write up a review on “Robots Will Steal Your Job, But That’s OK” when I’ve finished it.

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.

dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

Book Review: The Hidden Legacy by GJ Minett

Published: 5th November 2015

“A thought provoking, subtle mystery.”

fourandahalfstars

What Is ‘The Hidden Legacy’ About?

1966. A horrifying crime at a secondary school, with devastating consequences for all involved.
2008. A life-changing gift, if only the recipient can work out why . . .
Recently divorced and with two young children, Ellen Sutherland is up to her elbows in professional and personal stress. When she’s invited to travel all the way to Cheltenham to hear the content of an old woman’s will, she’s far from convinced the journey will be worthwhile.
But when she arrives, the news is astounding. Eudora Nash has left Ellen a beautiful cottage worth an amount of money that could turn her life around. There’s just one problem – Ellen has never even heard of Eudora Nash.
Her curiosity piqued, Ellen and her friend Kate travel to the West Country in search of answers. But they are not the only ones interested in the cottage, and Ellen little imagines how much she has to learn about her past . . .

Why Did I Read ‘The Hidden Legacy’?

For the first time, and hopefully not the last, I was able to read a novel written by someone local, published and successful. Considering this is GJ Minett’s debut novel, a lot can be said for the following this story achieved in the Kindle bookstore, peaking in sales to gain that all important ‘Best Seller’ accreditation.
This is not only inspiring to me, but an encouraging story to any ‘would be’ writers thinking of giving it a go.

What I Liked About ‘The Hidden Legacy’

Firstly, I read this story on my iPhone using the Kindle app. Has anyone else tried that? It’s not nearly as bad an experience as you might think.

The opening to this story is fantastic. Very well written. Like all good mysteries it gives you just enough to go on and yet nothing really in terms of motivation. So you start hooked before you’ve really got going.
I liked the layout of this novel, it felt quite unique. There wasn’t lots of chapters, but instead pockets of time concerning different characters broken up by four main parts. It allowed the novel to flow.
There were some lovely parts in this story, textured descriptions and a tone of realism throughout. In certain sections you could tell the author had laboured over each sentence. Ellen’s first visit to Primrose Cottage in particular was a stand out moment where Minett seized an opportunity for some interesting and creative writing.
The story has a maturity to it. An old soul. I wouldn’t say that it’s incredibly intense nor a slow burner, instead I came to think of it a bit like a scented candle that was relaxing and easy going to read, but with enough intrigue to keep me interested.
I can’t say I’ve read a book like this before, which is praise in itself. And though it’s a bit of cliché, I’ll admit I didn’t see the ending coming.

What I Didn’t Like About ‘The Hidden Legacy’

This isn’t the kind of story I would normally read, which is not necessarily a bad thing, but I do tend to prefer stories where the stakes are a little higher.
The main plot is reliant on you accepting that an incident from a playground in 1966 is still remembered throughout the country forty years later, and that it would cause some form of media hysteria if the identity of the killer (now rehabilitated) was made public. This is a little challenging to accept if you spend to much time thinking about it, especially with the story grounded in so much realism.

Good Or Bad

Was this book any good? Yes. Really glad I read it.
Would I recommend it? I would, with the caveat that this isn’t a ‘thrill ride’. It sits comfortably in the ‘Crime, Thriller & Mystery’ genre and it knows what it is: A thought provoking, subtle mystery.
Would I read it again? Maybe. This is one of those novels you could return to after a few years, but you might not get as much second time round knowing where it’s going.

I was happy to read that GJ Minett has another book due out this Autumn – I’ll be adding this to the list: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lie-Wait-GJ-Minett-ebook/dp/B01F91HUPC/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1467402269&sr=1-2

 

Here are some other reviews:

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Paper Towns by John Green
Parable Of The Sower by Octavia E. Butler
The Fault In Our Stars by John Green
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
On Writing (A Memoir Of The Craft) by Stephen King
The Big Short by Michael Lewis

What’s on the list?
Robots Will Steal Your Job, But That’s OK by Federico Pistono
Looking For Alaska by John Green
The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks
Parable of the Talents by Octavia E. Butler
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
The Perks Of Being A Wallfower by Stephen Chbosky
Lie in Wait by GJ Minett

 

Any suggestions?

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.

dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

Writing Notes: The Elements of Style by William Strunk Jr

This post started out as a book review of ‘The Elements of Style’ by William Strunk Jr, a book that Stephen King strongly advocates in his autobiography In Writing.

Very quickly my review notes became revision notes and the purpose of this book being more study material than anything else became clear.

I started listing the rules from ‘The Elements of Style’, but found myself recreating the book in summarised form, so for ease of reference, I have instead found the rules on YouTube, and linked these below.

Again, for ease of reference, find the below link to an online Oxford reference site which lists grammatical jargon with helpful definitions: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/grammar-a-z

Though there is some controversy on William Strunk Jr’s “rules” to writing, due to several of these points being considered more style options than rules, I am grateful for the advice and tips outlined in this book, and would recommend these rules as pointers on the right direction of correct grammar.

The rules are listed below:

How to Write Better No.1: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.1
Form the possessive singular of nouns by adding ‘s

How to Write Better No.2: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.2
In a series of three or more terms with a single conjuction, use a comma after each term except the last

How to Write Better No.3: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.3
Enclose parenthetic expressions between commas

How to Write Better No.4: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.4
Place a comma before conjunction introducing an independent clause.

How to Write Better No.5: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.5
Do not join independent clauses by a comma.

How to Write Better No.6: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.6
Do not break sentences in two.

How to Write Better No.7: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.7
Use a colon after an independent clause to introduce a list of particulars, an appositive, an amplifiication, or an illustrative quotation.

How to Write Better No.8: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.8
Use a dash to set off an abrupt break or interruption and to announce a long appositive or summary

How to Write Better No.9: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.9
The number of the subject determines the number of the verb.

How to Write Better No.10: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.10
Use the proper case of the pronoun.

How to Write Better No.11: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style: Usage Rule No.11
A participial phrase at the begining of a sentence must refer to the grammatical subject.

 

Have you read A Game For The Young?
Share your comments #agamefortheyoung

ORDER ON PAPERBACK | EBOOK
AMAZON (UK) | AMAZON (US) | WATERSTONES | BARNES & NOBLE | KOBO | SCRIBD | ROWANVALE BOOKS

 

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

Five Interesting Videos To Watch

John Green on Paper Towns and Why Learning is Awesome | TED Talks

Where’s The Fair Use? – Nostalgia Critic

10 Conspiracy Theories that turned out to be TRUE!

The Most Strange Places in the World – Captured on Google Earth

6 Foods You’re Eating Wrong

 

Have you read A Game For The Young?
Share your comments #agamefortheyoung

ORDER ON PAPERBACK | EBOOK
AMAZON (UK) | AMAZON (US) | WATERSTONES | BARNES & NOBLE | KOBO | SCRIBD | ROWANVALE BOOKS

 

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

My Favourite Author Interviews (Part 1)

Here are some of the author interviews I’ve enjoyed watching recently:

Lee Child

Lee Child interviewed by Stacey Cochran, during the promotion of ‘Gone Tomorrow’

Stephen King

Stephen King speaks on a number of topics and takes questions from students, faculty and others in a “Master’s Class”. King also premiered a new story, “Afterlife”.

Aaron Sorkin

Intimate interview with Aaron Sorkin

Alex Garland

Alex Garland wrote The Beach, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Never Let Me Go, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Dredd, and now, his first film a a director, Ex Machina. Alex Garland is passionate about art, high and low. And with his first film as a director, he has hit a subtle home run. He spoke to David Poland about the film, the process, and his artistic ambitions.

I especially like this one, because the writing method Alex describes in this interview mirrors my own.

Steven Mofat

The executive producer and head writer of Doctor Who and co-creator and executive producer of Sherlock, Steven Moffat, talks about how, where, when, what and why he writes.



If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

Thank you Etc Magazine!

I’d like to say a huge thank you to Laura Cartledge and everyone at Etc Magazine for their support.

In the September issue of Etc Magazine’s Sussex edition, there is a generous two page spread on me as an author and ‘A Game For The Young’ – along with snippets from a telephone interview I had with Laura last month. You can find the article on Pages 108-109.

Click Here To Download The Article in PDF

Here’s the text:

Quite a tale
LAURA CARTLEDGE discovers the remarkable story which began with a bucket list.
If you see books flying around Bognor Regis, David P. Philip might be to blame.As the author admits, when the box of his first novel arrived, he was tempted to ‘go out and Frisbee it at people – shouting ‘read this, read this’.’
“Everyone talks about that moment but I didn’t give it the credit it deserved,” he confesses. “Then it rocked up and it was amazing.”
A Game For The Young had been five years in the writing and was sparked by David making a bucket list of things he wanted to do.
“I was waiting for something I suppose,” he admits. “Then I read a book about focusing your ambitions, about setting them out rather than just dreaming about them.
“Along with skydiving and all the other clichés, one of mine was to write a novel,” he recalls.
“Because it was the only one which didn’t involve spending a lot of money or booking a holiday I went with it and it grew from there.”
The theme for David’s ‘pet project’ came about because of his long-standing interest in neurobiology.
“Not just how memory and thought patterns work but hallucinations, mindreading and subliminal messages – I find it all fascinating,” he enthuses.
“It was a case of finding a format of a story that would allow me to find out more.
“Then I was watching Minority Report and realised whenever you see anyone interacting with the brain it is always in a real slick and sci-fi way,” adds David. “But I thought the concept itself was big enough so I wanted a very raw story about the impact of something like that happening.”
The result is ‘an intimate story’ which is set against, and explores, a vast background subject.
At the centre of the tale is a group of Oxford students who ‘make a scientific discovery that changes their lives’.
What follows touches on themes of obsession, addiction and abuse of power, and plays with the concept of knowledge being a drug.
“It came about in a very chaotic way,” David smiles. “I read a lot about writing online, the pace, introducing characters, but I think I made every mistake you could.”
Asked if there were any surprises during the process, David says the friendly nature of the book community in general really struck him.
“I found if you want to speak to an author you get a message back quite quickly,” he admits.
“There is a lot of support and free advice, that took me back, it is not quite as competitive as I
feared it would be.
“I also didn’t realise it was so much fun to be creative in that way,” continues David. “It was just great to get stuck in to it – I am really proud of it.”
The experience has led him to feel that ‘everyone should do it’, even if just in terms of improving their grasp of the English language.
“I think everyone has a story. Now I have done it I can’t imagine not having something like this on the go,” he enthuses.
“Whenever I have spoken to people they always say ‘I have an idea’ for a book but it is such a long process, I understand that now.”
As a software company account manager for his day job, David describes becoming an author as being ‘a left turn at the traffic lights’, but credits it with giving him a ‘techie mindset’.
So what has he enjoyed the most?
“It is great when you have a reader you can’t immediately connect with, someone who isn’t a friend of a friend – while you do appreciate them – that is a big rush, you feel you have achieved it and there is a buzz with it,” David replies. “Now the hopes and dreams of being an author full-time are definitely there.”

‘A Game For The Young’ was published on March 31by Rowanvale Books, a paperback copy costs £8.99.
Visit www.rowanvalebooks.com or www.davidpphilip.co.uk for more information.

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.

dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

Ambient Sounds: Stellardrone

I’ve been trying to find the perfect music to blank out background noise.

Whilst searching on YouTube for ambient sounds, I’ve stumbled across a fantastic amateur composer called Stellardrone.

Stellardrone is an amateur composer from Lithuania who started creating music in 2007. He uses computer software and virtual synthesizers, and is mostly interested in ambient/electronic/space music.

From his artist page, he appears to have at least six albums of material and believes in releasing all albums for free – promoting free sharing of digital copies.

Click here if you’re interested: http://www.last.fm/music/Stellardrone

If you can recommend any similar music I’d love to hear it.



If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip

My Favourite Motivational Videos

This is as much a bookmark for my own benefit (I may add to these from time to time), but here are my favourite motivational videos. These are great to watch to help give you a little boost.

If you have any suggestions, please let me know.

Tim Minchin UWA Address 2013



Rocky Balboa (2006)



Al Pacino’s Inspirational Speech



Arnold Schwarzenegger: Life’s 6 Rules



Will Smith – Ultimate Motivational Speeches




If you’ve enjoyed this post, please follow my blog.


dp_signed

David P. Philip


Website: http://www.davidpphilip.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dppauthor
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dpp.author
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dpp.author
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DavidPPhilip
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dppauthor
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidPPhilip